Wednesday, May 22, 2019

Backyard Healing Herbs

March 20, 2019 by  
Filed under Treatments

Backyard Healing Herbs



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The Acid Reflux Strategy

March 16, 2019 by  
Filed under Treatments

The Acid Reflux Strategy



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Ranitidine and High Blood Pressure

March 3, 2019 by  
Filed under Articles

Ranitidine, known to millions by its trade name of Zantac, is an acid reducer and histamine blocker. It works by blocking histamine receptors in the lining of the stomach. Doctors prescribes it primarily to treat peptic ulcers, gastritis, and stomach reflux. They also prescribe it to treat rare conditions where the stomach produces too much acid possibly due to enlargement of the pancreas (Zollinger-Ellison syndrome). Ranitidine, in addition to the name Zantac, is marketed by other companies under various other names as well.

Fifty million or more people in the United States suffer from hypertension and the number increases every day. Blood pressure is the force of blood against the walls of arteries. When the pressure is too high, it causes the heart to work too hard and can lead to heart attacks or stroke. But what, if any, is the relationship of ranitidine to hypertension?

Although ranitidine was introduced to the public in 1981 and has been the subject of many studies, there has been very little direct study and no trials on the effects of ranitidine on hypertension. One study tested the effect on hypertension in patients that already had high blood pressure. The testing shown no elevation in blood pressure on these test subjects. This same study did not, however, test the effects on ranitidine on patients with a normal level of blood pressure.

In a study testing the cardiovascular effects of ranitidine on children, twelve children with congenital heart disease were intravenously given dosages of ranitidine. Although their heart rate fell below baseline levels, the researchers came up with no conclusion of the drugs affect on high blood pressure, rather determining that more study was needed. This study also did not test children with normal blood pressure levels.

Many people with hypertension who are thinking of taking Zantac or another ranitidine derivatives are rightly concerned with how the drug will affect their high blood pressure. One of the confirmed possible side effects of ranitidine is the slowing of the heart rate or bradycardia. If this happens the heartbeat may become too slow or too irregular to meet the body's demand. The result could be dizziness or lightheadedness. Whether this is dangerous to your health can only be determined by a qualified physician.

Although, not generally considered a side effect, there have also been reports from some patients that taking ranitidine increased their heart rate. If this is true, it would follow that their blood pressure would have increased also. However, at this time, there is no comprehensive evidence showing that there is any one-to-one correlation between ranitidine and high blood pressure.

If you have high blood pressure, and are taking ranitidine or Zantac, the best that you can do is to monitor your own blood pressure after taking the medication and notify your doctor of any significant change in the readings. You should also notify the doctor if you experience either a significant increase or decrease in your heart rate as either condition can adversely affect your health.



Source by Melissa Chow

GERD and Cottage Cheese

March 1, 2019 by  
Filed under Articles

GERD and cottage cheese are incompatible. GERD and milk are also incompatible.

Many people believe that milk and other dairy products will less heartburn, acid reflux, and GERD. The truth is, however, that heartburn and milk, GERD and cottage cheese, or any other of dozens of combinations may only make the problem worse.

National Heartburn Alliance's Heartburn Guide

If you call the National Heartburn Alliance toll free at 877-471-2081, you can request a copy of their heartburn guide. What will it tell you? It will advise you to stop heartburn, acid reflux, and GERD before they begin. To help you do this, they color-code various food groups.

* RED: Red means stop, of course. If a food is in this category, you should stop and rethink whatever to risk eating it.

* YELLOW: Use discretion in eating these foods.

* GREEN: Normally acceptable foods that seem to have little potential for causing heartburn, acid reflux, or GERD.

Dairy Products

GERD and cottage cheese make up only one combination against which the National Heartburn Alliance warns. Dairy products in general fall into the red and yellow categories of their guide – foods that GERD patients will want to avoid or eat cautiously.

"Red" foods for those who suffer GERD and similar complaints are cottage cheese, ice cream, milk shakes, and sour cream. They seem to have omitted regular milk, but other sites include it.

"Yellow" foods for GERD sufferers include low fat cottage cheese, cheddar cheese, frozen yogurt, mozzarella, 2 percent milk, skim milk, and yogurt.

Possible Explanation

Some believe milk is a perfect food for babies of any species, but not for adults. Other species of mammals stop drinking milk once they are weaned from the mother.

* Infant grizzly bears eat no honey, salmon, or berries. They live on mother's milk. Once they are weaned, however, they never again drink milk.

* Infant cattle do not graze on grass and sagebrush. They live on mother's milk alone. Once a calf is weaned, however, it never again puts milk into its stomach.

* Infant lions, tigers, and domestic cats rely on mother's milk for all nourishment. When they are weaned, that comes to an end. They become meat eaters, and never drink milk again.

* Humans are the only mammals that continue to drink milk into adulthood. We become adults, able to digest strong meat, but we still want milk with that meat – or coffee – or tea.

No GERD, Heartburn, or Acid Reflux

It is thought by some that when milk is the only food in the stomach, the gastric acid is neutralized. No heartburn or GERD. Neutralized acid allows milk proteins to survive and deliver essential hormones, immunoglobulin, and lactoferrins to the body. Milk stops digestion. It puts the process on pause long enough for the survival of substances that nurture and protect infants.

But, they say, milk was created to be alone in the stomach. Milk should not be combined with animal flesh from the prey, grains, grass, insects, or any other kind of food.

Put milk in the stomach with other foods, and it will prevent the stomach from doing its designated task. GERD, heartburn, or acid reflux can result.

Caution: The author is not a medical profession. The information in this article is for educational purposes only. If you have persistent GERD or related complaints, please see a physician for advice.



Source by Anna Hart